Games of Life

 THE RULES are meant to be read out loud.

01rules

 

Dead Husband’s Game of Life (cover)

02First-game-cover

Mixed media collage, acrylic paint on found candy box, 2000, 12″ X 10″ X 1.5″

Dead Husband’s Game of Life (inside)

03First-game-inside

“Dead Husband’s Game of Life” is the first of four so far. Each game looks different but the rules are the same. Making collages that are also games extends the interactivity between viewers and the art. One holds the game, shakes it and hears the rattle of the pieces in the box. Playing the game is optional. Merely reading the rules invites complicity on the part of the viewer. Everyone is a player.

 

 Momma’s Game of Life (cover)

04mamas-game-cover

Mixed media collage, acrylic paint on found candy box, 2003, 12″ X 9″ X 1.5″

Collection:  Daniel Reiss, New York City

Momma’s Game of Life (inside)

05mamas-game-inside

Momma’s Game of Life (with cover)

06mamas-game-with-cover

 

Game of Life for the Man I will Never Understand (cover)

07third-game-cover

Mixed media collage, acrylic paint on found candy box, 2005, 12″ X 12″ X 1.25″

Collection:  Noa Summerfield, San Diego, CA

Game of Life for the Man I will Never Understand (inside)

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Game of Life for the Man I Will Never Understand (top-bottom)

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 Game of Life For a Strong Woman (cover)

10carols-gamecover1

 Mixed media collage, acrylic paint, glicée print  on found candy box, 2010, 12″ X 8″ X 2″

Collection:  Carol Brenglass Spinner, NYC

Game of Life for a Strong Woman (inside with rules)

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 Game of Life for a Strong Woman (inside detail)

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 Game of Life for a Strong Woman (detail)

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On the Games of Life: Guest commentary by Dr. Vincent  Gonzalez, PH.d
“What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent?”
-F. Nietzsche

Judith Margolis’ “Game of Life” is compelling as a text or as a work of tactile and visual bricolage, but the richness of her experiment is clearest when it is explored on its own terms – as a game, and a “Game of Life” in particular. In Deluzeian terms, hers is an “ideal game” rather than an “ordinary” one, a game in which every rule is transformed by the act of play. This game bleeds beyond its box into larger life, invites a non-rational number of players, proposes an entirely subjective rule-set, and emerges from intimate idiosyncrasy rather than rational mass-production. It is a thrilling challenge to all the ways “play” has come to mean something decidedly unplayful, and so much more so because this wild play declares itself to be a vision of life.

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